The True Costs of Hard Water

November 4, 2014

Most people know the effects of hard water when they see them--soap scum, dry hair, scale on your pipes and shower head. It’s a nuisance, but it can also be a financial burden. Not only do you lose time as you scratch the scale buildup off your dishes and sink faucet, but you lose money.We’ve written before about the financial benefits of soft water, but we’re sure some people are still wondering, “But how will it help me save money? And more importantly, how much will I save?” The results may vary slightly for everyone depending on how much water you use and how many people occupy your home. However, the fact remains that you will save both time and money by investing in a water softener.Just a few examples of where you can potentially save money with soft water include:

  • Laundry detergent and toiletries like soap and lotion: can save around $830 per year due to 50% reduction in your need to purchase these items
  • Gas and electric bills: $64 saved with soft water through reduced heat loss
  • Laundry loads: $180 saved through better water efficiency
  • Appliances and plumbing: $90 saved through less need for repairs and replacement

That means you can easily save over $1100 a year simply by making the switch to soft water! Another area in which you can save is your clothes. Since your clothing items will be softer and brighter when washed with soft water, they won’t need to be replaced as often. You won’t have to watch your favorite t-shirt become brittle and faded after just a few washes.Making an investment in a quality water softener means having some extra cash left over in your budget. Most people don’t even realize the money they’re losing and the poor effects their water is causing until they buy their own water softener; they’re usually stunned by the difference!Ready to make the switch? Trust Jason’s Water Systems; we have the #1 water softener in America. Call us today for a free water evaluation and start saving!Sources: Water Quality Association, U.S. Dept. of Commerce, U.S. Dept. of Labor, National Industrial Conference Board, Water Conditioning Research Council, National Restaurant Assoc., American Laundry Institute, U.S. Bureau of Standards, Univ. of Ill., Univ. of New Mexico